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Bush Tucker Bake Off.

This recipe is an interesting Aussie take on a classic Italian recipe. The ground bush tomato gives the risotto a lovely tang while the wattleseed when combined with onions and garlic lends a caramelized touch. These Aussie influences transform this Italian staple to satisfy local taste buds. Find the recipe on our website.

Risotto with an Aussie Twist

This recipe is an interesting Aussie take on a classic Italian recipe. The ground bush tomato gives the risotto a lovely tang while the wattle seed when combined with onions and garlic lends a caramelized touch. These Aussie influences transform this Italian staple to satisfy local taste buds. Find the recipe on our website.

www.craigmuirlakehouse.com

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Ingredients Pasta

  • 220 g durum semolina flour

  • 120 ml warm water

  • 1 tsp olive oil extra virgin (we used Rio Vista Olives’ Nothin’ But Classic)

  • 1 tsp wattleseed ground

  • 1/2 tsp peppermint gum dried and ground

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • I added sweet potato as a point of difference. You can add whatever you like as well.

Pesto

  • 60 g roasted macadamias

  • 40 g basil

  • 2 tbsp olive oil extra virgin (we used Rio Vista Olives’ Nothin’ But Classic)

  • 30 g pecorino cheese

  • 1 large clove garlic

  • 3 large sprigs sea celery

  • 2 large sprigs seablite

  • 4-5 leaves native mint leaves

  • 1 leaf mountain pepper

To Serve

  • 3-4 mountain pepper berries cracked

  • 6-8 native mint leaves


Instructions

  • Mix together the flour and salt, and then form into two equal flour wells. Add the wattle seed into one well, along with the water and oil. Bring it together into a ball, and then knead for 10 minutes before covering with cling wrap. Repeat with the river mint gum and the remaining dough ingredients, and then similarly seal in cling wrap. Leave both to rest for 30 minutes, away from heat and sunlight.

  • Cut each ball of dough in half, and roll them out into long, very thin sausages, no thicker than a pencil. Cover any dough that you’re not working on to prevent it drying out. Chop the sausages into small pea-sized pieces, shape into balls, and then use a cavarola (or gnocchi board), the back of a grater, or the underside of a fork to roll into malloreddus. The technique is to roll each piece away from yourself, providing just enough downwards pressure to imprint the dough as it folds over itself. Transfer to lightly-floured baking-paper lined trays, and refrigerate for up to one week, uncovered.

  • To make the pesto, add all ingredients into the mortar and pestle and pound until mostly smooth with some chunks, or to your desired consistency. For a greener colour, finely chop the leafy ingredients beforehand.

  • Drop the malloreddus into boiling water, and cook for 4-5 minutes or until al dente. Note that the larger you make your pasta, the longer they will take to cook (up to 20 minutes for grape-sized balls). You know they’re ready if still firm but showing no white dough when cut into. Drain, retaining a little of the pasta water, and toss into the pesto. If needed, add a little of the water back in to help the pesto and pasta emulsify. Serve with cracked mountain pepper berries.


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